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North Dakota

North Dakota’s path to a cottage food law resembles a roller coaster ride, but not necessarily a fun one. Prior to 2017, the state did not have a cottage food law, but local health departments still allowed certain types of non-perishable foods to be sold at farmers markets, roadside stands, and some public events. Each […]

Texas

Texas passed an amendment (HB 970) to their cottage food law in September 2013, which greatly loosened the restrictions of their original cottage food law (SB 81). In 2019, they passed another amendment (SB 572) which greatly expanded it again. After many attempts to improve the law, Texas now has a good cottage food law. Producers can sell anywhere […]

Arkansas

Arkansas created a cottage food law in 2011 (Act 72), and it was amended in 2017 (Act 399) and 2019 (Act 775). This law is somewhat limited, since it restricts allowed food to non-PHF foods in five categories (baked goods, candy, jams/jellies, fruit butters, and chocolate-covered fruit), and only allows direct sales from home and […]

California Microenterprise Home Kitchen Operation

California’s bill (AB 626) which allows for “microenterprise home kitchen operations” was passed on September 18th, 2018 and went into effect on January 1st, 2019. Although the law is a first-of-its-kind and has been described as a “game-changer”, the reality is that the bill is so severely limited, it is unlikely to make much of […]

West Virginia

West Virginia has one of the best cottage food laws in the country. For many years, they had very specific and restrictive laws which only allowed a few types of food items to be sold at farmers markets. Then in 2018, they passed a new law which expanded the allowed foods list but still restricted […]

West Virginia Acidified Foods

West Virginia’s main cottage food law allows many types of homemade food to be sold. Producers can use both laws (that newer one, and the one listed below) if they wish. This older law is still useful for those who want to sell acidified foods (pickled products, sauces, salsas, etc), non-standard jellies (pepper jelly), non-standard […]

Alaska

Alaska’s cottage food law is fairly flexible, though only direct, in-person sales are allowed, and producers are limited to $25,000 of sales per year. The law allows most non-potentially hazardous foods, including many items that are not allowed in other states, like soda and some types of fruit juices. Some higher-risk products need to be tested to […]

Kentucky

For many years, only Kentucky farmers could sell homemade food, leaving it as one of the last states without a basic cottage food law. But that changed in 2018 when the law was amended (HB 263) to make it available to everyone. With this law, home-based processors can make many types of non-perishable foods and […]

Wisconsin Pickle Bill

Wisconsin is different from every other state in that they allow homemade canned goods, but they don’t allow homemade baked goods. Also known as the “Pickle Bill”, this law was modeled after their neighboring state’s law, except that Minnesota’s law does allow baked goods as well as canned. Wisconsin’s pickle bill is the most restrictive […]

Florida

Florida passed an amendment (HB 1233) to their cottage food law in 2017, which allowed internet sales and raised the sales limit to $50,000. Florida now has a very good cottage food law, especially considering that it is very easy for a producer to start selling: no license, inspection, or training from the ag department […]

Colorado

The “Colorado Cottage Foods Act” began in 2012 and was amended in 2013, 2015, and 2016 (read about the history of the act). 2016’s amendment (SB 16-058) added all non-PHF foods to the approved list (including pickled items) and enabled internet sales within the state. The current law restricts producers to direct sales only, but no license from […]

Mississippi

Prior to 2013, Mississippi only allowed sales of homemade food at farmers markets, but they passed a new cottage food bill (SB 2553) that year to allow in-person sales at other venues as well. However, individuals can now sell only $20,000 of homemade food per year. Fortunately, many types of food products are allowed, and it’s very […]

Minnesota

Minnesota passed a new law in 2015 (SF 5) which greatly improves their former cottage food law, which used to be one of the most restrictive in the nation. Cottage food operations can now sell most types of non-potentially hazardous foods from home and at some local markets, and they can sell up to $18,000 of […]

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is a bit different than other states in that it doesn’t have laws specific to cottage food operations, but the Department of Agriculture simply allows “limited food establishments” that meet specific guidelines. The application process is lengthy, but limited food establishments have a lot of flexibility once they’re setup. Unlike other states, in Pennsylvania, there are many similarities between the […]

Wyoming

The Wyoming Food Freedom Act (HB 56) is a huge step forward for the “food freedom” movement in the United States. Wyoming is the first state to pass a law that eliminates almost all regulations on local, homemade food sales. It is so different that it is hard to compare Wyoming to other states with cottage […]

Oregon Farm Direct

The Farm Direct Bill in Oregon is for processors that grow the primary ingredients of what they produce, and it allows them to bypass licensing and fee requirements. For instance, this law would work well for an individual that grows strawberries in their garden and wants to sell the strawberry jelly they make at home. […]

Kansas

Kansas does not appear to have any official law governing the sale of homemade foods, but the Department of Agriculture does allow most non-potentially hazardous foods to be sold at farmers markets and events, without needing a license from them. There are very few requirements to adhere to, and there is no sales limit, but products […]

Iowa

Iowa has two different laws for home cooks, depending on what they want to make. Producers that sell only non-potentially hazardous food products do not need any license or permit from the health department, but they can only sell at home or at farmers markets. There are no sales limitations, and the labeling requirements are […]

Virginia Home Food Processing Operation

Unlike almost every other state, Virginia allows people to operate very unrestricted food businesses out of their homes. Their food laws are very different than most states, written in such a way that there is not any distinction between a food business that uses a commercial kitchen versus a home kitchen. Instead, the distinction is provided by […]

Louisiana

Louisiana’s cottage food law (Act 542) was started in 2013 and amended in 2014. The amendment (HB 1270) greatly increased the number of foods allowed, and it also increased the amount of regulations CFOs must follow. There is a sales limit of $20,000 per year. Unlike every other law, Louisiana imposes specific restrictions on preparers of breads, cakes, cookies, […]

Michigan

Michigan’s cottage food laws are somewhat limited, but many people use them and they are still one of the most active cottage food states. The number of allowed foods in Michigan are above average, in comparison with other states, but they are very specific about what is allowed.  Fortunately, there is no need to obtain […]

Utah

Utah requires a relatively lengthy application process to sell cottage foods, but fortunately, the law is quite flexible once the cottage food operator is setup. The $107 (or more) process involves a business license application, food handler training, a home inspection, and a cottage food product application, which includes detailed written recipes and possibly product […]

South Dakota

South Dakota has fairly flexible laws, but processors that want to sell directly out of their home must follow different rules. The laws, which were established in 2010, allow the processor to sell their goods in-person at markets and events. They allow most baked goods, as well as candies and most canned goods. Each product […]