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Makin’ Friends, Sellin’ Food, Havin’ Fun with Connie & Rick Martin

Connie & Rick Martin live in Charleston, WV and sell a very unique product with their cottage food business, We B Fryin Snacks.

They sell a meat-free (wheat-based) version of pork rinds along with crunchy cinnamon twists.

Their product is so addicting that it practically sells itself, and they’ve managed to get it into 15 different stores, and counting.

For most food businesses, marketing is the biggest challenge. But in Connie & Rick’s case, their biggest challenge is keeping up with production.

In this episode, you’ll get to hear the unique way that they discovered their product, their crazy state fair story, how they’ve grown the business through the pandemic, and how they’re trying to scale it in the future.

As you listen, pay attention to how many of Connie & Rick’s opportunities came through their networking skills. You will quickly realize that their secret to success lies in making connections and always being willing to ask for help along the way.

Mixing It Up with Cassie Menchhofer

Cassie Menchhofer lives in Celina, OH and sells dried mixes (like soup mixes, baked mixes, and spices) with her business, Cassie’s Country Cupboard.

Cassie started her business in 2011, and she managed to grow it despite having a full-time job and two very young kids.

After running her business for 8 years under Ohio’s cottage food laws, she decided to take her business to the next level.

In 2019, Cassie built an FDA-approved manufacturing facility on her property, which is a step-above a commercial kitchen.

With the facility, she now sells her mixes through stores and online, shipping nationwide. She even uses her facility to offer a co-packing service for other small food businesses.

In this episode, you will hear all about Cassie’s unique business journey.

Rising From The Ashes with Scot & Christine Steenson

Scot & Christine Steenson have one of the craziest startup stories that you’ll ever hear!

They used to live in Paradise, CA, and as you may know, their entire town was destroyed back in 2018’s Camp Fire, which was California’s deadliest and most destructive wildfire in history.

Scot & Christine now live in Forest Ranch, CA and sell roasted coffee with their cottage food business, Road Roaster Coffee Company.

After losing their home and nearly all of their physical possessions, they had to start over. And that’s exactly what they did!

Christine had long dreamed of opening a coffee shop. So they decided to try it. After all, why not? They literally had nothing else to lose.

And as you’ll see, they actually had a whole lot to gain! Their coffee business quickly took off and they have been going pedal to the metal ever since.

With almost $50,000 of sales last year, they are one of the most successful cottage food businesses in California.

In this episode, you’ll hear how they created a very unique brand that flies in the face of traditional coffee marketing, and how their mission driven approach has allowed them to become very involved in their local community.

You’ll also learn what it really means to be living in paradise.

No Stopping, Keep Popping with Payshee Felt & Steve Bivans

You know those kettle corn vendors you see at fairs that pump out mass quantities of popcorn, and make it live on-site?

That’s what Payshee Felt and Steve Bivans now do (except in a not-so-generic way) in St. Paul, MN with their popcorn business, Payshee’s Popcorn.

But they didn’t start that way. They actually used their cottage food law to prepackage dozens of bags of homemade popcorn for their local farmers market each week.

And they did that from home for two years before they were ready to make the leap to some pretty-pricey equipment for popping tons of popcorn live at events.

They have gone from making just a few hundred dollars each weekend, to now selling over $5k of popcorn in a weekend!

Initially, Payshee romanticized her vision for the business, imagining herself custom-flavoring each bag for a customer in real-time, and serving it from a Cretors wagon.

That idealistic vision not only delayed their business, but also cost them a pretty-penny before they realized that they should just keep it simple and start from home.