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Mississippi Can you legally sell food from home in Mississippi?

Cottage Food Law

Prior to 2013, Mississippi only allowed sales of homemade food at farmers markets, but they passed a new cottage food bill (SB 2553) that year to allow in-person sales at other venues as well.

However, individuals can now sell only $35,000 of homemade food per year. Fortunately, many types of food products are allowed, and it’s very easy to get started, as no registration or permit from the health department is required.

Selling Where can you sell homemade food products?

Starting a cottage food business?

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Allowed Foods What food products can you sell from home?

Prohibited Foods

Certain items may require lab testing.

Only "non-potentially hazardous" foods are allowed, but certain non-PHFs may not be allowed. Most foods that don't need to be refrigerated (foods without meat, cheese, etc.) are considered non-potentially hazardous. Learn more

Limitations How will your home food business be restricted?

Limitations
Sales are limited to $35,000 per year

Business What do you need to do to sell food from home?

Although no training is required, it is strongly recommended by the health department, especially for those making acidified or pickled products (canned goods).

Labeling How do you label cottage food products?

Sample Label

Chocolate Chip Cookies

"Made in a cottage food operation that is not subject to Mississippi's food safety regulations."


Forrager Cookie Company

123 Chewy Way, Cookietown, MS 73531


Ingredients: enriched flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), butter (cream, salt), semi-sweet chocolate (sugar, chocolate, cocoa butter, milkfat, soy lecithin, natural flavors), brown sugar, granulated sugar, eggs, vanilla extract (vanilla bean extract, alcohol, sugar), baking soda, salt (salt, calcium silicate)


Contains: milk, eggs, wheat, soy


NET WT 2 lb 4 oz (1.02 kg)


Resources Where can you find more information about this law?

Department
Health
Contacts

Mississippi State Department of Health

Department
Food Protection Division
Telephone
601-576-7689
Law Dates
February 2008
MCA 69-7-109
July 2013
SB 2553
July 2020
HB 326

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Starting a cottage food business?

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Mississippi Forum Got questions? Join the discussion

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This forum contains 5 topics and 14 replies, and was last updated by  Sharon D 2 years, 11 months ago.

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A 2- part question. I have been asked to sell a taco casserole. Would this be ok under this? #2- if a friend tags me in a FB post, that they bought a cake or casserole, would that be exempt from online advertising? I’m looking to make a few extra dollars and people have asked me to sell my cakes and casserole. I’m not food safe certified which has kept me from doing this.

    1. No, nothing with meat or cheese is allowed.
    2. I think the intention is that they don’t want you trying to promote yourself online. If a friend posts your item (a cake that doesn’t need refrigeration, for instance) without you encouraging them to do it, I don’t think that would be considered online advertising.

We are making a BBQ sause and canning it. We have already had all the lab testing done and I have completed the ServSafe certification. Would you know if this would fall under the cottage law.

I am about to start a cottage food operation from my home and am wondering about frosting that contains Cream Cheese like for a Red Velvet Cake or Cinnamon rolls. Is that allowed? I know I usually refrigerate any cake or bread just because they stay fresher longer but wouldn’t consider it hazardous to leave it out either. Just wondering.

I’m sure it’s probably a no-brainer, but would Facebook and any other social media fall into the online web presence categorie? Like posting a picture and stating I have this item available?

I plan to sell dog biscuits at the local farmers markets on the coast. Do the exact laws apply to dog biscuits as biscuits intended for human consumption? I plan to sell by quantity of biscuits, not by weight; is that allowed?

    It’s possible that some kinds of salsa would be allowed, but you probably need to get them lab tested. You should call your health dept and see if they require that.

We are planning on selling some baked products in Mississippi and we thought the cottage food operation is a great way to get started. Our main concern is the legal definition of “A cottage food operation may not sell or offer for sale cottage food products over the Internet”. We do consider that saying “we have cakes for sale at $X.XX” while operating as a Cottage Food Operation will be illegal under this law, since that will be advertising. But, can we display what we have done so far over the Internet kind of a portfolio showing what we have accomplished so far? To us the legal definition of “advertising” is not that clear, since we can just say what we have been up to and not really be telling anyone to buy anything. Any thoughts/advice will be well received.

    I am not the health dept, but I believe the intent is that these small businesses would not have any kind of web presence. Mississippi is one of the only states that disallows online advertising, and I don’t know why they do. However, I could see there being a gray area… for instance, if you write a personal blog and write about how you just made an awesome cake, I don’t see how they could say no to that. But if you have a website dedicated to listing all of the cakes that you’ve made, then they would probably see that as promoting your business. As I said, I don’t know what they were thinking and you really have to call them to find out… and if you do, please let us know.

CF operation in Mississippi and products produced are listed in new Mississippi CFO law, but all sales in Louisiana thru Goodeggs (distributor).
QUESTION: I assume both La and MS CFO laws must be followed-is that correct???

    There is no licensing process, but you should probably call your planning division to make sure there are no other requirements (like getting a business license).

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