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Kentucky

For many years, only Kentucky farmers could sell homemade food, leaving it as one of the last states without a basic cottage food law. But that changed in 2018 when the law was amended (HB 263) to make it available to everyone. With this law, home-based processors can make many types of non-perishable foods and […]

Kentucky Microprocessor

You can only use Kentucky’s law for home-based microprocessors if both of these apply to you: You want to sell low-sugar, low-acid, or acidified canned foods You grow the primary or predominant ingredient in your canned foods If both of those apply to you, see below for more information about becoming a home-based microprocessor. If those […]

Wisconsin

Wisconsin is a lucky state. That is because Lisa Kivirist, a co-author of Homemade For Sale, lives there, and without her dedication and rallying others’ support, it is quite possible that the below allowance for selling homemade baked goods would not exist. Wisconsin tried to change their law for many years, but they were always […]

Wisconsin Pickle Bill

Wisconsin is different from every other state in that they allow homemade canned goods, but they don’t allow homemade baked goods. Also known as the “Pickle Bill”, this law was modeled after their neighboring state’s law, except that Minnesota’s law does allow baked goods as well as canned. Wisconsin’s pickle bill is the most restrictive […]

Illinois

Illinois has two different laws in place that allow the sale of homemade food. This page covers the older law, which is for “cottage food operations”. The newer law is for “home kitchen operations,” which you should use if you want to sell baked goods outside of farmers markets. Aside from being able to sell outside of farmers […]

Colorado

The “Colorado Cottage Foods Act” began in 2012 and was amended in 2013, 2015, and 2016 (read about the history of the act). 2016’s amendment (SB 16-058) added all non-PHF foods to the approved list (including pickled items) and enabled internet sales within the state. The current law restricts producers to direct sales only, but no license from […]

Delaware On-Farm Home Processing

Delaware’s cottage food law allows individuals to sell many homemade products, but the setup process is fairly complicated, and sales are limited to $25,000 per year. This page explains Delaware’s separate law for on-farm home processing, which is more limited in some ways, but for those who meet the requirements, it allows more sales and may be easier […]

Delaware

For over a decade, Delaware’s cottage food law was only available to farmers. In September 2016, the health department created and enacted some new rules that allow many more people to start a “cottage food establishment” (CFE) from their home kitchen. Although the cottage food law is much more expansive than it used to be, it […]

Tennessee

In 2012, Tennessee updated their home-based food laws to make it much easier for cooks to sell their homemade food. Although a license or inspection from the ag department is no longer required, producers can only sell in-person at certain venues. However, sellers may still utilize the older domestic kitchen law if they want to sell indirectly […]

Minnesota

Minnesota passed a new law in 2015 (SF 5) which greatly improves their former cottage food law, which used to be one of the most restrictive in the nation. Cottage food operations can now sell most types of non-potentially hazardous foods from home and at some local markets, and they can sell up to $18,000 of […]

Wyoming Cottage Food

Wyoming now has a food freedom law which might entirely replace this one. However, since products sold under the food freedom law can only be consumed at a private home, this original cottage food law might still be useful for some types of sales. For instance, a wedding cake can probably be sold directly under this […]

Virginia

Virginia allows producers to make certain types of food from home without needing a license or inspection from the ag department. The information on this page only pertains to operations that do not get their home kitchen inspected. If you want to make more types of food or to sell in more venues, you can […]

South Dakota Home Sales

In 2011, South Dakota created some extra legislation to extend the Home-Processed Foods Law.  This allows bakers to sell their food directly from home, and it limits yearly sales to only $5,000.  It also doesn’t allow non-baked goods, like jams and preserves, but baked goods do include candy and confections.  There is no registration required […]

South Dakota

South Dakota has fairly flexible laws, but processors that want to sell directly out of their home must follow different rules. The laws, which were established in 2010, allow the processor to sell their goods in-person at markets and events. They allow most baked goods, as well as candies and most canned goods. Each product […]

Indiana

Indiana’s laws are restrictive in that sales are only allowed at farmers markets and roadside stands.  Aside from that, however, the laws are quite lenient.  They allow for any food below a certain pH value or water activity level, which basically allows nearly any kind of non-potentially hazardous food.  There is no registration, fees, or […]