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Florida

Selling Under the Cottage Food Law

This topic contains 15 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Cottage Oven 4 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 11 through 16 (of 16 total)
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  • #38179

    Angela

    Saw this older post and was wondering if there’s been any update. I’ve seen a lot of people (not in Florida) who make cookies for real estate agents and other businesses (packaged and labeled according to regulations) but the purpose is for the agent to give to clients.

    #38191

    David Crabill
    Keymaster

    Angela, I haven’t heard of an update. My response to Aimee above is still as much as I know. If you talk to the ag dept and can post an update, that would be much appreciated!

    #38232

    Angela

    Thanks. If I learn anything I will post. Also, FYI in case you didn’t know, FL Gov. Scott signed the bill allowing sales and payment over the internet but delivery still face to face. The bill also raised the gross income cap from $15,000 to $50,000.

    #39067

    David Crabill
    Keymaster

    Thanks for letting me know about the new law!

    #41191

    Desiree Pino

    I’m interested in selling my cookies under the cottage food operations, but If I become a LLC (Limited Liability Company) as some friends have suggested, how does this differ from just getting a license or permit?

    #41585

    Cottage Oven
    Moderator

    Desiree,

    Being an LLC doesn’t change anything with regard to actual cottage-food law – just the way some aspects of the business may operate. For example, because of the way the name of the LLC is registered, you won’t have to go through the separate process of registering a fictitious name. None of that has anything to do with the products you make and how you sell them under cottage-food law.

    Also, be sure to read the cottage-food guidance PDF file from freshfromflorida.com to learn what you you can and cannot do. There are no licenses or permits other than the county (and, in some cases, municipal) “occupational license” (nowadays called “business tax receipt”) which just allows you to run the business but has nothing to do with cottage-food law, in particular.

    Any other requirements for permits, food-handling or food-management certification, etc. may be imposed by specific markets (if at all) but are not part of Florida’s cottage-food law.

Viewing 6 posts - 11 through 16 (of 16 total)

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