Skip to main content

Wyoming

Wyoming has the best cottage food and food freedom law in the United States. They passed the Wyoming Food Freedom Act in 2015 (HB 56), making them the first state to eliminate most regulations on local homemade food sales. Unlike most states, Wyoming residents can sell ANY kind of food, as long as it does […]

North Dakota

North Dakota’s path to a cottage food law resembles a roller coaster ride, but not necessarily a fun one. Prior to 2017, the state did not have a cottage food law, but local health departments still allowed certain types of non-perishable foods to be sold at farmers markets, roadside stands, and some public events. Each […]

Texas

Texas passed an amendment (HB 970) to their cottage food law in September 2013, which greatly loosened the restrictions of their original cottage food law (SB 81). In 2019, they passed another amendment (SB 572) which greatly expanded it again. After many attempts to improve the law, Texas now has a good cottage food law. Producers can sell anywhere […]

Arkansas

Arkansas created a cottage food law in 2011 (Act 72), and it was amended in 2017 (Act 399) and 2019 (Act 775). This law is somewhat limited, since it restricts allowed food to non-PHF foods in five categories (baked goods, candy, jams/jellies, fruit butters, and chocolate-covered fruit), and only allows direct sales from home and […]

West Virginia Acidified Foods

West Virginia’s main cottage food law allows many types of homemade food to be sold. Producers can use both laws (that newer one, and the one listed below) if they wish. This older law is still useful for those who want to sell acidified foods (pickled products, sauces, salsas, etc), non-standard jellies (pepper jelly), non-standard […]

Kentucky

For many years, only Kentucky farmers could sell homemade food, leaving it as one of the last states without a basic cottage food law. But that changed in 2018 when the law was amended (HB 263) to make it available to everyone. With this law, home-based processors can make many types of non-perishable foods and […]

Colorado

The “Colorado Cottage Foods Act” began in 2012 and was amended in 2013, 2015, and 2016 (read about the history of the act). 2016’s amendment (SB 16-058) added all non-PHF foods to the approved list (including pickled items) and enabled internet sales within the state. The current law restricts producers to direct sales only, but no license from […]

Oregon Farm Direct

The Farm Direct Bill in Oregon is for processors that grow the primary ingredients of what they produce, and it allows them to bypass licensing and fee requirements. For instance, this law would work well for an individual that grows strawberries in their garden and wants to sell the strawberry jelly they make at home. […]

Kansas

Kansas does not appear to have any official law governing the sale of homemade foods, but the Department of Agriculture does allow most non-potentially hazardous foods to be sold at farmers markets and events, without needing a license from them. There are very few requirements to adhere to, and there is no sales limit, but products […]